National Lawyer's Guild

Member Recap: September 2022

Welcome to NLG’s Member Recap, our monthly virtual newsletter to keep you up-to-date with the latest NLG National, Chapter, and Committee news, programs, and announcements!

Support and Celebrate NLG!

It’s the last day to become a #Law4ThePeople sponsor or place an ad in our tribute journal!

Join us in honoring the exemplary work of our awardees and build with our radical community of lawyers, law students, and legal workers by becoming a sponsor or purchasing an ad! Your support will ensure that the work of the NLG can continue in the struggle for justice and liberation!

Become a SponsorPlace an Ad in the Tribute Journal New Publications and Resources NLG Blog: Student Loans Must Go

Be sure to check out our latest blog on the student loan crisis, authored by NLG-Los Angeles Executive Director Christopher Chavis.

You can open the blog online by clicking this hyperlink.

If you’d like to have your writing featured in the NLG Blog, please reach out by email to traci@nlg.org and communications@nlg.org. Please note that not all suggestions or submissions will be published.

Upcoming Events [OCTOBER 13, 2022] Annual NLG Awards Celebration

Be a part of our virtual celebration at the 2022 NLG #Law4ThePeople Awards on Thursday, October 13th! At our annual awards celebration, we will honor the outstanding work of this year’s Law for the People, Ernie Goodman, C.B. King, and Legal Worker Award recipients.The NLG National Immigration Project will also be there to honor the Carol Weiss King and Daniel Levy Award recipients.

Learn more about all the 2022 honorees here and join us in congratulating them at the virtual awards ceremony on Thursday, October 13!

Register Now [OCTOBER 24, 2022] Membership Meeting: Military Law Task Force

NLG International hosted a webinar on the crisis in Ukraine with a wide-ranging The NLG Military Law Task Force (MLTF) will be hosting an open membership meeting on Monday October 24, 9-11 AM PT / 12 – 2 PM ET. Join them to discuss the Task Force and learn about ways to get involved!

Zoom information below. Please note that this link will ONLY work during the specified time.

Topic: NLG Military Law Task Force (MLTF) Membership Meeting
Time: Oct 24, 2022 09:00 AM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 885 8992 3484
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Upcoming and Ongoing Campaigns NLG’s Becoming Abolitionists Reading Group

As a part of our commitment to learning and growing together, we invite you to join us in reading Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom by Derecka Purnell as part of an NLG-wide reading group.

We encourage Chapters, Committees, and other NLG groups to use our reading guide to organize their own reading groups and discussion circles.

Open Reading Guide Opportunities to Get Involved with NLG Committees Guild Notes Now Accepting Submissions for Winter 2022 Issue

The deadline to submit your work is November 4, 2022. Please send your submission by email to communications@nlg.org, with “Guild Notes Submission” in the subject line. You can learn more about our submissions guidelines on our website.

For inspiration, check out the Spring 2022 issue of Guild Notes online!

NLG Review is Looking for New Board Members and Editors

The NLGR is NLG’s intellectual journal which aims to publish timely, insightful articles and respond to the interests and needs of the progressive legal and activist communities. We are currently looking to expand the editorial board and have openings for the following volunteer positions:

  • Managing Editor: The managing editor will work closely with the executive editor to keep track of accepted and rejected submissions, and keep tabs on various internal deadlines after the executive editor makes editing assignments. The ideal managing editor will have strong organizational skills, be available to regularly check and respond to emails, and work collaboratively with the editor in chief and executive editors to keep track of article submissions.
  • Contributing Editors: Contributing editors will be responsible for preliminary review of submissions, making recommendations on whether to accept articles for publication, and editing accepted articles prior to their publication. We ask that contributing editors be able to commit to editing one to two articles per year.

This could be an excellent opportunity for academics, practitioners, and/or law students. If you are interested in any of the listed positions please contact Dalia Fuleihan at nlgreview.editorinchief@nlg.org.

Please include a resume and a brief statement of interest which describes your prior writing/editing experience if any.

The post Member Recap: September 2022 first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

NLG Blog: Student Loans Must Go

By Christopher Chavis
NLG-LA Executive Director

President Joe Biden recently announced a plan to cancel a limited amount of student loans for borrowers making under $125,000 per year. The plan calls for $20,000 in cancellation for those who received Pell Grants and $10,000 for all other eligible borrowers. This plan is a critical first step in addressing the student loan crisis, but there’s still a lot to be done. This plan does not fully address the systemic inequities that fuel the student loan crisis and does not establish a plan to prevent further escalation. As students return to campuses around the country, we must ensure that this issue remains at the top of everyone’s priority list. 

The existence of tuition—and by extension, student loan debt—is problematic. It commodifies knowledge and creates barriers to education, a fact that  leads to the insidious idea that higher education is only a means to find employment. Students are being pushed into certain majors or fields because the status quo presents college as an investment that is meant to “pay off,” rather than a personal or intellectual experience. This is classist. A student from a lower socioeconomic background is expected to select a “lucrative” major or attend graduate programs that filter into higher-paying fields. However, a student from a wealthier socioeconomic background can “afford” to major in whatever they wish because their families can absorb the cost of their education. Their family’s financial circumstances should not dictate a student’s academic experience. 

A student from a lower socioeconomic background is expected to select a “lucrative” major or attend graduate programs that filter into higher-paying fields. However, a student from a wealthier socioeconomic background can “afford” to major in whatever they wish because their families can absorb the cost of their education.

Higher education is meant to be an experience through which a student can broaden their horizons, learn new things, meet people from different backgrounds, and have experiences that contribute to personal development. The Yale Report of 1828 captured this historical mission when it plainly stated, “[t]he course of instruction which is given to the undergraduates in the college, is not designed to include professional studies. Our object is not to teach that which is peculiar to any one of the professions; but to lay the foundation which is common to them all.” At its core, higher education is meant to be a way to lay a foundation of knowledge that will be beneficial in a person’s professional and personal endeavors.

When the Yale Report was written, there were only a handful of colleges, and access to higher education was almost exclusively limited to the financially well-off. As access to higher education has grown, however, this mission has been applied inequitably. The fact that your college experience depends on parental income is an outgrowth of the classist idea that college should cost money. A student should not be sentenced to years of debt just because they dared to explore an area of personal interest. They should also not be subjected to debt for pursuing a well-rounded curriculum instead of specialization. Those who do go on to professional programs should not be saddled with debt for pursuing a less lucrative field within that profession, such as public interest law. 

As the Los Angeles chapter of the National Lawyers Guild noted in our press release on this matter, student loan debt disproportionately impacts Black, Indigenous, and other people of color. Generations of intentionally racist policy decisions caused BIPOC to collectively hold less wealth than white households. “Separate but equal” was a myth propagated by white supremacists. BIPOC around the country saw their communities decimated and destroyed by white supremacist politicians who would rather sentence these communities to a lifetime of poverty than see them thrive. As opportunities to attend colleges have increased for students of color, so has tuition. As new highways to knowledge are being built, toll booths are being made right in front of them. 

Tuition is also rising at a pace that far outpaces inflation. According to Law School Transparency, attending a public law school would have only cost $4,763 in 2019 dollars per year in 1985. By 2019, the average tuition was $28,186. In essence, law school is almost six times more expensive (when adjusted for inflation) than it was nearly four decades ago. The ability to attend law school with low or no debt is a privilege increasingly reserved for the wealthy or those fortunate to receive a scholarship. However, students who do receive scholarships are also often subjected to strict GPA requirements. If a student fails to meet those criteria, they either abandon law school or go into further debt to complete their studies. Neither is an optimal choice, especially considering how factors like holding a part time job, maintaining familial obligations, and facing institutional discrimination can negatively impact GPA at no fault of the student themself.

As opportunities to attend colleges have increased for students of color, so has tuition. As new highways to knowledge are being built, toll booths are being made right in front of them.

This affordability crisis results in low-income students being disadvantaged regarding career options. While programs such as Income-Based Repayment (IBR) and Pay As You Earn (PAYE) exist to lessen the burden of monthly payments, they do not erase the debt in the short term. Further, they are a band-aid that leads graduates deeper into debt. Even if students make their payments on time, negative amortization will lead them deeper into debt as interest compounds. The fact that a student can pay their loans on time and still accrue more debt represents a structural inequity designed to benefit the federal government. When interest compounds on existing debt, that is additional money that the student must pay to the federal government or private lenders, who profit from the pain inflicted upon low-income people and their families. The government should never profit from the hardships of its citizens. 

This crisis has direct impacts on public interest community work. A low-income student may find it prohibitively difficult to return and serve their community and may feel pressured to take a higher-paying job, to pay down their student loan balance. While the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program exists to mitigate that concern, it does not fully encapsulate the myriad of ways that a person can serve their community. For example, a student who returns to serve their community by working for a small law firm would not be eligible for PSLF because they are not working for a non-profit entity. Additionally, PSLF requires ten years of qualified employment before forgiving the debt—a timeframe that may be especially daunting for students from low-income backgrounds.

It is unconscionable that higher education is hidden behind an increasingly expanding paywall. Recognition of this fact is gaining traction among lawmakers, and what was once a fringe idea is moving into the mainstream. President Biden’s limited cancellation is a step forward but more needs to be done. This issue is a matter of equity and justice. As students accumulate astronomical amounts of student loan debt, the avenues through which they can serve their communities are closing. 

Americans collectively hold $1.75 trillion in student loan debt. In 2019, President Donald Trump signed a $1.9 trillion tax cut into law, which disproportionately favored corporations and high-income earners. We know that this is possible and the Biden Administration must stand on the side of equity and justice. Student loans must go.

The post NLG Blog: Student Loans Must Go first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

2022 Resolutions, Amendments, and Elections

About the NLG Governance Process

As a democratic organization, the work and focus of the NLG is decided by our members. Each year, we hold plenaries in which members discuss programmatic priorities, often in the form of resolutions. We also update our governing documents, our Bylaws and Constitution, and elect new officers to serve on the NLG National Executive Committee (NEC).

This year, NLG will not have a consolidated #Law4thePeople Convention. However, governance matters will be handled during the NLG Governance Plenaries on October 22 and 23, 2022, from 1-4 PM ET. The plenaries will be virtual and open to all current NLG members. All voting will take place online after the plenaries. 

Only members are eligible to vote in NLG elections. To join or renew, visit nlg.org/join.

NLG Governance Timeline

September 21, 2022

  • Deadline for proponent to complete procedural compliance (if needed).

September 22, 2022

  • Final proposed resolutions and bylaw amendments will be placed on the NLG website.

October 2, 2022

  • Deadline for members to suggest friendly amendments to proposals (no revisions are accepted on the plenary floor)

October 12

  • Deadline for proponents to re-submit final versions with friendly amendments and endorsements

October 21, 2022

  • Deadline to submit emergency resolutions (24 hours before convention begins)
  • Deadline for any candidates for national officer positions to nominate themselves.

October 22

  • Deadline for people to join/renew their Guild membership in order to vote in the election

October 22-23, 2022

  • Governance plenaries.

November 1, 2022

  • Deadline for pro and con statements to be submitted. 

November 4, 2022

  • Online voting begins

December 6, 2022

  • Online voting closes; results will be posted once voting has closed. 
About Amendments, Resolutions, Friendly Amendments, and Emergency Resolutions

What are Amendments and Resolutions?

Amendments

  • The membership has updated the constitution, originally adopted in 1937, at many conventions. The current constitution and bylaws are available here: nlg.org/about/bylaws-and-resolutions/
  • Amendments can be made to either our constitution or our bylaws.

Resolutions

  • Resolutions are an opportunity for our membership to propose and agree on statements of programmatic priorities for our organization and to take stances on various issues.
  • Examples of resolutions here: nlg.org/about/bylaws-and-resolutions/

Emergency Resolutions

  • Emergency resolutions are resolutions based on events that take place after the initial sixty-day deadline, and up to twenty-four hours prior to the voting plenary. The twenty-four hour deadline may be waived in the event that an emergency resolution is non-controversial as determined by the Resolutions Committee and confirmed by the actual vote. Emergency resolutions must comply with all resolution requirements not related to timeliness.

Friendly Amendments

  • Friendly amendments are recommended changes to the amendment or resolution, which the proponent(s) may choose to either accept or reject.

For more information on Resolutions, Constitution and Bylaws Amendments, see the NLG Bylaws, Section 8.

Process for Submitting Proposals

Email Submission

  • Proposed resolutions, bylaws amendments, and constitutional amendments must be emailed in attachment form by August 1, 2022, Midnight (Pacific Time). Late submissions will not be accepted.
  • Early submission is encouraged, as resolutions and amendments often require edits to be made for submissions to be in full accordance with the procedural requirements.
  • Emails should be addressed to resolutions@nlg.org

Procedural Requirements (Please read carefully!)

The attachment with the proposed resolution or amendment must:

  • On its face include the name and contact information of the person submitting the resolution or amendment. This ensures members can contact the proponent before and during the convention.
  • Contain a specific and explicit implementation clause indicating what individuals or entities will do the work of implementing the resolution (i.e. the Resolutions Committee, the National Office, a local chapter, etc.). Per an amendment approved at the 2014 convention, proponents are only required to have attempted to obtain consent of those tasked with implementing the resolution. If any person or entity is tasked with implementing the resolution, the face of the resolution must indicate that the proponent has contacted such persons or entities before submitting the resolution. Proposal must indicate if 1) proponent has the consent of all persons obligated, 2) that consent was denied, 3) that consultation was impractical and why, or 4) that approval was requested but was not granted or denied.
  • Not exceed 3 pages, 12-point font, including endorsing entities or names. Shorter proposals are encouraged. Endorsing names and entities must be included within the 3-page limit.
  • Proposal must include the name and contact information of the person who will present the proposal in the two plenaries.
  • Any submission that has been denied for lack of obtaining explicit agreement of a tasked entity or individual to implement the resolution or amendment may be appealed to the Executive Council of the NEC by contacting Suzanne Adely at president@nlg.org.

All primary proponents should plan to present and speak on behalf of the amendment or resolution at the virtual plenary. If they will not be present, proponents should notify the Resolutions Committee and appoint an alternate delegate to present and answer questions during the plenary.

Note: Amendments from the floor are not accepted, so people objecting to proposals should speak with proponents well in advance of the plenaries to see if they are willing to amend their own proposals before they come to the plenary floor.

Information For Candidates for Elected National Office

Each year, the NLG holds elections to choose the officers of the National Executive Committee (NEC). All current NLG members in good standing are eligible to run for an elected office, although it is recommended that candidates have one year of Guild membership before running for a position. If you are interested, please email a brief candidate statement to NLG Director of Research and Education Traci Yoder at traci@nlg.org before October 21, 2022. If you have any questions about the election process, please email Traci.

In 2022, the following offices are up for election:

Secretary

The Secretary position begins in 2022 and ends at the 2025 Governance Plenaries. This position is responsible for recording and sharing the institutional knowledge of the organization, and participating on the National Executive Committee (NEC) and Executive Council (EC). For more information, please read the NLG Secretary Job Description.

Student National Vice President (SNVP)

The SNVP serves for a 2-year term on the National Executive Committee (NEC), and participates on the Executive Council (EC) during the 2nd year of their term. The SNVP represents the interests of law student members of the NLG. More details about the position can be found in the SNVP Job Description.

This position is only open to current law student members.

Legal Worker Vice President (LWVP)

The LWVP serves for a 2-year term on the National Executive Committee (NEC) and the Executive Council (EC). The LWVP represents the interests of the legal worker membership of the NLG. For more information, please read the NLG LWVP Job Description.

This position is only open to current legal worker members.

Information for Candidates for National Positions Elected by Constituencies

Candidates for national office which are selected by regions, projects, task forces, or committees (e.g., Regional Representatives, representatives from The United People of Color Caucus and Queer Caucus, and representatives from NLG projects and national committees) should refer to their respective entities for procedures and available offices.

All Proposed Amendments and Resolutions

PDF versions of each proposed Amendment and Resolution can be found below, along with brief summaries of each proposal.

Proposed Resolutions

Resolutions are member-written proposals which advocate for the NLG to take a specific position or action as an organization. This year, members will vote on the following Resolutions:

Below are shortened summaries of each Resolution. These summaries are meant to serve as a guide for voters to determine which Resolutions they’d like to read in full and vote on, since members do not need to vote on each proposal and we understand there are a lot of proposals this year. They are not meant as a replacement for reading the full Resolutions. Please read the full Resolution before casting a vote.

Challenging Empire: National Lawyers Guild Resolution in Support of Anti-Colonialism, Anti-Racism, and Indigenous Sovereignty

This Resolution proposes that NLG formally states its solidarity with Indigenous peoples globally and its opposition to U.S. empire. The Resolution goes on to propose long- and short-term goals for aligning the NLG with anti-colonial struggle, including establishing a working group for anti-colonial political education, repairing our relationships with Indigenous movement partners, and others. 

NLG Resolution Calling for a Reinvigorated Solidarity Campaign with the Cuban People

This Resolution proposes that NLG support Cuban humanitarian and solidarity initiatives, in light of the ongoing and escalated anti-Cuban policies made by the United States government in recent years. The Resolution urges NLG to demand an end to the sanctions against Cuba, suspension of the Helms-Burton Act, and a restoration of the right to travel to Cuba.

Resolution on Corporate Constitutional Rights

This Resolution proposes that the NLG endorse and educate people about the We the People Amendment, a current piece of legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives. The legislation aims to abolish corporate constitutional rights (also called corporate personhood).

Resolution to decharter Delaware-New Jersey NLG Chapter

This Resolution would revoke the Delaware-New Jersey NLG Chapter Charter. The NEC (NLG’s national board) recommends revoking the Charter.

Voting YES would decharter the Delaware-New Jersey Chapter, and chapter members would become members-at-large (NLG members without a chapter affiliation). Voting NO would allow the Delaware-New Jersey Chapter to keep its charter.

Resolution to include Buffalo in the Northeast Region

This Resolution would include the Buffalo, New York NLG Chapter in the Northeast Region with the rest of the NLG’s New York State chapters. Historically, the Buffalo NLG Chapter has been assigned to the Mid-East Region with Ohio, Michigan, and Pittsburgh.

Voting YES would add Buffalo to the Northeast Region. Voting NO would keep Buffalo in the Mid-East Region.

Amendment to Change the Definition of Legal Worker

This Amendment would update the definition of “legal worker” in the NLG Constitution. Currently, the Constitution says a legal worker is somebody working, who has worked, or who is training to work at an office or collective that provides legal services. The proposed change would add “for pay or as a volunteer,” to include potential members who may do unpaid legal work.

Administrative Amendments

The following proposals all deal with making the NLG governing document text reflect our actual organizational practices. None of them recommend a change to our actual day-to-day operations. 

Voting YES on any of these Amendments would mean supporting these updates being formally incorporated into the governing documents. Voting NO on any of these Amendments would be rejecting these updates.

Below are shortened summaries of each Amendment. These summaries are meant to serve as a guide for voters to determine which Amendments they’d like to read in full and vote on, since members do not need to vote on each proposal and we understand there are a lot of proposals this year. They are not meant as a replacement for reading the full Amendments. Please read the full Amendment before casting a vote.

Amendment to Change Bylaws Section 1.6 and 1.7 – Progressive Dues Schedules

This Amendment would add a clause allowing for a fee waiver for members who cannot afford to pay annual dues. The National Office currently allows fee waivers when members request them, but it is not written in the NLG Bylaws.

Amendment to Change Constitution Article 5.11 – Travel Expenses

If passed, this Amendment would add the Student National Vice President and Legal Worker Vice President to the list of elected NLG board members who can get reimbursed for travel expenses to and from in-person NLG meetings. Currently, the NLG Constitution lists all elected representatives except for these two positions. In practice, all board members have been reimbursed for NLG-related travel expenses.

Amendment to Change Constitution Article 2.2(c) – At-Large Membership

If passed, this Amendment would edit the NLG Constitution to accurately reflect that the National Office approves or denies requests from individual members who want to join as members-at-large (this usually occurs when a new member is located in a geographic area without a Chapter). Currently, the NLG Constitution assigns that responsibility to the NEC (NLG’s national board), but this administrative task is done by the National Office in practice. 

Amendment to Change Constitution Article 3.1(c) – Geographic Chapters

If passed, this Amendment would give the National Office the responsibility of defining Chapter geographic areas, in consultation with the relevant members and Chapter(s). Currently, the NLG Constitution assigns this responsibility to the NEC (NLG’s national board); in practice, this is a task that the National Office has been primarily navigating for over a decade.

Amendment to Change Constitution Article 3.4 – Denial of Chapter Application

This Amendment would reflect that the National Office is the entity that works with Chapters to make sure no two Chapters areas overlap. Currently, the NLG Constitution assigns this responsibility to the NEC (NLG’s national board); in practice, this is a task that the National Office has been primarily navigating for over a decade.

Amendment to Change Bylaws Section 1.7 – Dues Schedules

This Amendment would update the NLG Bylaws to allow the National Office to determine the membership fees for at-large members. Currently, the NLG Bylaws assign that responsibility to the NEC (NLG’s national board). In practice, the National Office has been setting these rates for over a decade.

Amendment to Change Bylaws Section 15 – Convention Evaluation and Survey

This Amendment would have the convention evaluation be sent out by the National Office, not the NEC (NLG’s national board). The NLG Bylaws currently assign this responsibility to the NEC, but in practice, the National Office has sent out the survey and reported back to the NEC.

Amendments to Update Constitution Article 5 – Ombudsperson

These Amendments remove the “Ombudsperson” role from the list of NEC (NLG national board) positions. This is meant to allow the NEC to hire an Ombudsperson, instead of having that role as a volunteer board member.

Amendment to Article 5.2 (a) removes “Ombudsperson” from the list of elected NEC officers.

Amendment to Article 5.1 removes “Ombudsperson” from the list of all NEC officers.

Amendment to Update Constitution Article 7 – Referenda

This Amendment removes sections of the NLG Constitution that describe “referenda,” or a vote that includes all members. These sections were originally written when the NLG Convention used to use a delegate system. The NLG no longer uses a delegate system, and instead, all members are eligible to vote on Amendments, Resolutions, and officer positions. This section is therefore no longer relevant.

Voting YES on this Amendment would remove the references to referenda.

Amendment to Change Bylaws Section 8.12 – Vote Timing

This Amendment will give the National Office five (5) days from receipt to notify members of the final versions of all proposed Amendments and Resolutions. It will achieve this by asking the Resolutions Committee to finalize the text five days earlier, so membership will not experience any delay.

Currently, the Constitution requires the National Office to post all final versions, and format and send an email to all members, on the same day that they receive the final version. This is usually logistically impossible.

Amendment to Change Bylaws Section 8.3 – Sending Proposed Resolutions and Amendments

This Amendment will give the National Office ten (10) days after the governance plenary to send the voting form to members. Currently, the NLG Bylaws state that the National Office must send this link “immediately after” the governance plenary.

Procedural Amendments

The following proposals all recommend a change to a procedure outlined in the NLG Constitution or Bylaws.

Voting YES on any of these Amendments would mean supporting these updates being formally incorporated into the governing documents. Voting NO on any of these Amendments would be rejecting these updates.

Below are shortened summaries of each Amendment. These summaries are meant to serve as a guide for voters to determine which Amendments they’d like to read in full and vote on, since members do not need to vote on each proposal and we understand there are a lot of proposals this year. They are not meant as a replacement for reading the full Amendments. Please read the full Amendment before casting a vote.

Amendment to Constitution Article 3.2 – Regions

This Amendment would resolve a discrepancy between the Constitution and Bylaws. The Bylaws allow the NEC (NLG’s national board) to decide the boundaries of a Region, while the Constitution says an all-member vote at the annual Convention decides, delaying decisions up to a year. This amendment would change the Constitution to allow the NEC to decide the boundaries of a Region.

Amendment to Bylaws Section 2 – Dissolution of Chapters

This Amendment would revise the NLG Bylaws to allow the NEC (NLG’s national board) to dissolve a Chapter by a vote of two-thirds majority, in cases where the three-fourths of the Chapter membership petitions to be dissolved, or if the NEC determines the Chapter is unable to function due to having too few members. Currently, the Bylaws require this process to be decided by an all-member vote at the annual Convention, which can delay decisions for up to 12 months.

Amendment to Constitution Article 8 – Conflict and Discipline

These five (5) Amendments all revise Article 8 of the NLG Constitution to allow the NEC (NLG’s national board) to decide Chapter and member discipline issues. Currently, the Constitution requires that these decisions be made by an all-member vote at the annual Convention, which can delay decisions for up to 12 months.

Amendment to Article 8.1 gives the NEC authority to censure a Chapter by a vote of two-thirds majority.

Amendment to Article 8.2 gives the NEC authority to revoke a Chapter Charter by a vote of two-thirds majority.

Amendment to Article 8.3 requires the NEC to issue charges in writing and give the Chapter an opportunity to be heard before voting on censure or revocation.

Amendment to Article 8.4 states that local Chapter decisions about discipline may be appealed to the NEC.

Amendment to Article 8.5 allows the NEC to vote on censure, suspension, or expulsion of at-large members, who do not have a local Chapter to do this.

The post 2022 Resolutions, Amendments, and Elections first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

Member Recap: August 2022

Welcome to NLG’s Member Recap, our monthly virtual newsletter to keep you up-to-date with the latest NLG National, Chapter, and Committee news, programs, and announcements!

New Publications and Resources .kt-sc_eab2ce-96 .kt-sc-imgcol {min-height:450px;} NLG Mass Incarceration Committee’s Black August Resources + Playlist

As August comes to a close, the NLG Mass Incarceration Committee has put together a collection of resources and a playlist for members and allies to commemorate Black August.

More information about Black August, alongside the resources and playlist, can be found on our Black August webpage by clicking the button below.

Open the Webpage .kt-sc_6eddd2-2e .kt-sc-imgcol {min-height:450px;} NLG Statement on Movement Legal Work, Collective Defense, and the Role of Law

“If limitations and biases are inherently part of the law, and if fairness in the legal system is unachievable given deeply embedded structural inequity and oppression, we should help defendants collectivize their resistance in order to create stronger, more emboldened movements.”

Open the full statement on our website by clicking the button below.

Open the Statement .kt-sc_836bf5-c7 .kt-sc-imgcol {min-height:450px;} UNC Law NLG Chapter Disorientation Zine

In preparation for the incoming class of new law students, NLG UNC Law School Chapter put together this super cool zine version of our DisOrientation manual.

Check it out at the link below!

Open the Zine Upcoming and Recorded Webinars and Events [SEPTEMBER 8, 2022] Webinar: 
A Trauma-Informed, Anti-Racist Approach to Legal Advocacy

Burnout, capacity, vicarious trauma, and structural racism continue to be pressing issues for legal advocates, especially during a pandemic and civil rights uprising. This training is designed to help you rethink your approach to legal advocacy entirely that will result in increased sustainability for you as the advocate, holistic care for the people you serve, and outcomes that disrupt unjust systems.

Accessibility information: CART captioning and ASL interpretation provided

Register Now CLE Series: Activism and Advocacy through Military Law

The NLG Military Law Task Force (MLTF) has begun a series of monthly CLEs on activism and advocacy through military law. Future sessions will include topics such as challenging military racism, military policy on sexual assault and sexual harassment, Army AWOL policy, and the like. For information about the September CLE or the program in general, go to MLTF announces 2022 training series: Advocacy & Activism through Military Law – Military Law Task Force (nlgmltf.org).

Learn More Upcoming and Ongoing Campaigns NLG’s Becoming Abolitionists Reading Group

MLTF’s Virtual Literature TableAs a part of our commitment to learning and growing together, we invite you to join us in reading Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom by Derecka Purnell as part of an NLG-wide reading group.

We encourage Chapters, Committees, and other NLG groups to use our reading guide to organize their own reading groups and discussion circles.

Open Reading Guide Opportunities to Get Involved with NLG Committees NLG’s Military Law Taskforce Seeking Support Updating Resources on Military Gender-Based Violence

MLTF’s Military Gender Justice Committee is planning updates on our legal memo, brochure, and self-help guide on military sexual assault and sexual harassment. We are seeking law students or other NLG members to review recent regulations and bring our several-years-old materials up to date.

If you’re interested in helping with this project, please contact Jeff Lake at jeff@carpenterandmayfield.com.

NLG Review is Looking for New Board Members and Editors

The NLGR is NLG’s intellectual journal which aims to publish timely, insightful articles and respond to the interests and needs of the progressive legal and activist communities. We are currently looking to expand the editorial board and have openings for the following volunteer positions:

  • Managing Editor: The managing editor will work closely with the executive editor to keep track of accepted and rejected submissions, and keep tabs on various internal deadlines after the executive editor makes editing assignments. The ideal managing editor will have strong organizational skills, be available to regularly check and respond to emails, and work collaboratively with the editor in chief and executive editors to keep track of article submissions.
  • Contributing Editors: Contributing editors will be responsible for preliminary review of submissions, making recommendations on whether to accept articles for publication, and editing accepted articles prior to their publication. We ask that contributing editors be able to commit to editing one to two articles per year.

This could be an excellent opportunity for academics, practitioners, and/or law students. If you are interested in any of the listed positions please contact Dalia Fuleihan at nlgreview.editorinchief@nlg.org.

Please include a resume and a brief statement of interest which describes your prior writing/editing experience if any.

NLG Student Spotlight: Welcome to DisOrientation Season! From left to right, images depict students tabling for NLG at University of North Carolina (UNC), Mississippi College of Law, and University of Oregon

The ever-incredible NLG law students are back on campus and building programs for new and returning students to engage with movement legal work. Their work directly helps grow the next generation of people’s lawyers, committed to using law as a tool to forge a more just future.

These photos are just a few of our dedicated students. We’re wishing them all the best!

The post Member Recap: August 2022 first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

Black August

Black August is about Black power and liberation, honoring the rich history of community organizing, activism, advocacy, and care that sustain the fight for freedom. Black August is a time to uplift the struggle for an end to the prison industrial complex (PIC), a horrific and inhumane system that the state uses to enact violence upon Black and other marginalized people. In our commitment to human rights, the National Lawyers Guild commemorates Black August alongside the generations of Black freedom fighters who continue to pave the way to a world where all people are free. These ongoing legacies are an essential part of any future where human rights are valued and respected. Resist: Unconquered Still ⁠— NLG Mass Incarceration Committee’s Black August Resource List

Comrades, please join us in celebrating Black liberation and uplifting the human rights of prisoners. Engage these materials in any particular order in community or alone. Please join NLG’s Becoming Abolitionists reading group, support Jailhouse Lawyers Speak, and check out our playlist at the link below!

MIC Black August Playlist

FILMS
I Am Not Your Negro
Judas & the Black Messiah
Eyes to the Prize: On Hallowed Ground
A Great and Mighty Walk
Betrayal At Attica
Black Power Mixtape
Concerning Violence
Summer of Soul
Exterminate All the Brutes
Time

PODCASTS
Being Seen
Mother Country Radicals

BOOKS
Purnell, Becoming Abolitionists
Davis, Freedom is a Constant Struggle
Cooper, Eloquent Rage
Morrison, Song of Solomon
Michael Williams, Woke
Coates, We Were 8 Years In Power
Jones, 1619 Project

ARTICLES
The Black Art of Escape
The Case for Reparations

The post Black August first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

Press Release: NLG Urges U.S. to Condemn Israel’s Raids on Palestinian Human Rights Organizations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 22, 2022

Contact: Director of Communications
communications@nlg.org
(212) 679-5100, ext. 5

NEW YORK CITY, NY — On August 18, Israeli troops raided the offices of six human rights organizations, confiscated their materials, and shut down the entrances. All the organizations’ offices are located in Area A of the occupied West Bank, which is legally a Palestinian Authority-administered area. In a letter to the U.S. Secretary of State, the National Lawyers Guild (NLG) urges the U.S. government to condemn these violent human rights violations and demand that, at minimum, Israel allow these organizations to resume their operations.

In October 2021, the Israeli government unjustly assigned a terrorist designation to these six organizations: Al-Haq, Addameer, Defense for Children International – Palestine, the Union of Agricultural Work Committees, the Bisan Center for Research and Development, and the Union of Palestinian Women Committees. These groups provide critical services for Palestinian women and girls, children, low-income families, workers, farmers, prisoners, and civil society activists, including monitoring and documenting human rights violations. Israel prohibits international investigative bodies from accessing occupied territory, so these local organizations are often the only groups allowed to do on-the-ground human rights monitoring.

“By raiding these organizations, Israel escalated its ongoing human rights violations by denying Palestinians access to essential services and human rights monitoring,” said Suzanne Adely, NLG President. “The United States must condemn these actions, as the lives and safety of millions of Palestinians urgently depends on it. The State Department must immediately call on the Israeli government to rescind the terrorism designations and cease harassment.”

In a joint statement, the six organizations elaborated on the violent attacks.

“The dismantling of Palestinian civil society is a dangerous and repressive measure, designed to quash human rights investigation, monitoring and oversight of governing authorities in the OPT [Occupied Palestinian Territory], with widespread and generational consequences for the protected civilian population,” the statement said.

NLG urges all allied organizations to join in condemning these latest attacks on Palestinian human rights and, more broadly, in solidarity with the struggle for Palestinian liberation. 

The National Lawyers Guild has used law to promote human rights over property interests for 85 years. For more information on our International Solidarity work, please visit the NLG website.

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The post Press Release: NLG Urges U.S. to Condemn Israel’s Raids on Palestinian Human Rights Organizations first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

NLG Statement on Movement Legal Work, Collective Defense, and the Role of Law

Endorsed by the NLG National Executive Council and the NLG Mass Defense Committee

The National Lawyers Guild has put into practice the principles of movement legal work since the organization was founded in 1937. More than 80 years later, NLG membership passed a resolution on Movement Lawyering and Collective Defense in 2021 to formally adopt these principles, and to recognize that movement legal work can be “both client-centered and politically transformative.”

Many definitions have been offered over the years to help us better understand what differentiates movement legal work from the zealous advocacy more commonly practiced in the legal field. One definition of movement legal work that reflects NLG values can be found in a 2017 NYU Clinical Law Review essay by Betty Hung, a member of the Los Angeles NLG chapter:

Lawyering that supports and advances social movements, defined as the building and exercise of collective power, led by the most directly impacted, to achieve systemic institutional and cultural change.

Another definition that reflects NLG values comes from Law for Black Lives:

Movement lawyering means taking direction from directly impacted communities and from organizers, as opposed to imposing our leadership or expertise as legal advocates. It means building the power of the people, not the power of the law.

Yet, the legal work of supporting movements is about more than just “lawyering” and involves more than just lawyers. This work necessitates the engagement of lawyers, legal workers, and often law students, not to mention activist-defendants themselves, which is why we’ve adopted the term “movement legal work.”

It should be evident from the definitions above that movement legal work is about more than just representing activists and zealously defending them in court. What follows is a deeper look at what movement legal work means to the NLG.

Exploring Movement Legal Work

People arrested as a consequence of politically motivated actions often consider themselves part of social movements. They define their goals and strategies in terms of what is likely to protect or advance the welfare of their co-defendants or larger social movements, rather than what is most likely to protect them from individual legal risk or liability. Therefore, movement lawyers and legal workers must endeavor to center the goals of activist-defendants and be willing to help advance their self-determined political interests and strategies, in an effort to build their political power.

One of the most well-known examples of movement legal work in practice is the “Chicago 8” trial. NLG lawyers William Kunstler and Leonard Weinglass worked collectively with their activist-defendants to use the spectacle of a months-long conspiracy trial as an opportunity to advance the movement against the Vietnam War and shine a light on the injustice of the legal system itself. The defendants engaged in a collective defense strategy despite facing criminal conspiracy charges, and they used tactics inside and outside of the courtroom to achieve goals other than lessening their legal harm.

Collective defense is just one of many strategies to advance social movement struggles. However, movement lawyers and legal workers need to consider using collective defense strategies like non-cooperating joint defense agreements, and waiving certain legal conflicts of interest, to the benefit of the movement writ large.

For collective defense to function effectively, lawyers, legal workers, defendants, and sometimes defense committees convened to support activist-defendants, all need to work and strategize together. This can facilitate greater agency and horizontal participation by movement actors in the legal process.

By contrast, the practice of representing activists as wholly separate from their social movements serves the mystification and inaccessibility of the law and legal work, and upholds the status quo where legal technicians hold power over the communities and movements they endeavor to support.

Resistance Lawyering

In his thoughtful and painstakingly researched California Law Review article (2019), legal scholar Daniel Farbman advances the concept of “resistance lawyering,” which fits well with NLG principles of prison and policing abolition. Farbman defines resistance lawyering as lawyers employing “every means at their disposal to frustrate, delay, and dismantle the system within which they [are] practicing.” A relative definition, rather than an absolute one, Farbman describes resistance lawyering as “an attitude toward a set of procedures rather than any fixed political commitment.”

Farbman’s foundational example of resistance lawyering: attorneys who fought the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, not just by mitigating the worst injustices of that law in order to achieve the best possible outcomes for their clients, but also by resisting, obstructing, and dismantling the system itself. In this context, Farbman uses the word “system” not to describe the law more broadly, but a particular legal regime embedded in it, like slavery or capital punishment.

While the resistance lawyers of the 1850s did not think they were dismantling the institution of chattel slavery in the courtroom, according to Farbman, they saw cases arising from the Fugitive Slave Law as an opportunity to wage a “vigorous rhetorical proxy battle against slavery.” And, while lawyers were not the primary heroes of the story, they were “active and powerful partners in the political resistance to the law.”

Whereas resistance legal work can be defined as a rejection of certain legal regimes, it can be grounded in a fundamental commitment to the law more broadly. Indeed, for legal tactics to effectively achieve a particular outcome, we may not be able to entirely rupture our relationship to the legitimacy of the process or accomplish such outcomes outside the boundaries of legal practice.

Notably, however, some movement lawyers and legal workers, especially within the ranks of the NLG, not only question the legitimacy of specific procedural mechanisms of the law, but the very purpose and structure of the system. Farbman argues that these movement lawyers and legal workers will always be “engaging strategies of resistance because they are using the tools of a system that they consider illegitimate to try to tear that system down.”

Ethics of Movement Legal Work

Lawyers and legal workers who engage in movement legal work use an array of legal tools at their disposal, but do so in a participatory, power-sharing process within the lawyer-client relationship, according to legal scholars Gerald Torres and Lani Guinier. In this way, lawyers and legal workers directly support the production of cultural shifts that make lasting change possible, all within the parameters of legal jurisprudence.

Movement legal work is consistent with and supported by the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct. Model Rule 1.2 states that, with few exceptions, “a lawyer shall abide by a client’s decisions concerning the objectives of representation and, as required by Rule 1.4, shall consult with the client as to the means by which they are to be pursued.”

All lawyers have a duty to empower every client to define their own goals, and the Model Rules acknowledge that a client’s goals may go beyond judicial outcomes. While movement lawyers and legal workers should never pressure anyone to engage in collective defense strategies, they have a professional and moral responsibility to openly share information relevant to an individual’s defense, as well as implement a defense strategy—within the bounds of the law—to accomplish the stated goal of a client, who may actually have multiple goals, including advancing movement interests.

Solidarity with co-defendants and consideration for the impact to social movements are legitimate concerns for activist-defendants. For those who want to work collectively, non-cooperating joint defense agreements, grounded in the common interest privilege, can enable activist-defendants to share information without violating or waiving attorney-client privilege. Joint defense agreements can bind the parties from disclosing any privileged information to anyone who is not a party to the agreement.

The notion that an unwaivable conflict arises from joint defense strategies, as some have argued, is contrary to both the Model Rules and the principles of the NLG. Such a position presumes, in the face of countervailing evidence, that political and legal goals are mutually incompatible, and that the goals of one client are necessarily inimical to those of another.

By centering social movement goals and working collectively together, activist-defendants may pursue a variety of legal and/or political strategies and tactics. From the “Chicago 8” example above, activist-defendants may simply want to use their legal case to generate publicity around movement issues and demands.

Activist-defendants and arrestees may want to use their combined leverage to pursue forms of collective bargaining, in which they work together to negotiate plea agreements or terms of release beneficial to everyone, or in which defendants facing less serious charges refuse plea agreements until their more seriously charged co-defendants are offered favorable resolutions.

Activist-defendants who center social movement goals may choose to explicitly oppose aiding the government in the investigation or prosecution of other activists, such as non-cooperating plea agreements, or pursuing trial strategies that don’t identify or blame other activists for illegal activity.

By contrast, activist-defendants who seek to minimize their individual legal liability at the expense of their comrades by directly cooperating in the prosecution of others, or denouncing comrades in the hopes of gaining a mitigated sentence, are not engaging in movement defense strategy, and those who support this approach are not practicing movement legal work.

Some attorneys have raised concerns that their affiliation with a movement-aligned organization may create a conflict of interest prohibiting them from representing movement activists. But in our view, no Model Rule supports that position. We think such arguments are not just misguided; they are dangerous, as prosecutors may exploit them to deny activists their chosen legal counsel.

The Call to Engage in Movement Legal Work

If limitations and biases are inherently part of the law, and if fairness in the legal system is unachievable given deeply embedded structural inequity and oppression, we should help defendants collectivize their resistance in order to create stronger, more emboldened movements. We must consider alternatives to the more traditional models of legal work that embrace those aspects of the legal system designed to atomize and isolate defendants.

In order to practice movement legal work, we must acknowledge and diminish the power imbalances that commonly exist between lawyers, legal workers, and activist-defendants, which may entail intentionally relinquishing certain privileges we’ve gained during our lives, or even ones we were born with.

We must challenge certain assumptions and remove the obstacles preventing us from better meeting the needs of social movements. In doing so, lawyers and legal workers may be called on to engage in deep self-reflection, political analysis, give up power, and genuinely assess the systems within which we work. We may also be called on to learn and implement unfamiliar organizing methods, and to develop skills outside of litigation, all with the aim of integrating our support more explicitly with movement goals in order to magnify the impact of our efforts.

We’re up for the challenge!

In the months and years ahead, the NLG will continue to grapple with these concepts and work to expand the understanding of movement legal work among its membership and the social movements it supports.

The post NLG Statement on Movement Legal Work, Collective Defense, and the Role of Law first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

NLG Supports Akron’s Local Organizing Demands After Police Murder Jayland Walker

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 11, 2022
Contact: Director of Communications
communications@nlg.org
(212) 679-5100, ext. 5

NEW YORK CITY, NY — On June 27, Akron, Ohio police murdered Jayland Walker, a 25-year-old Black man and Akron resident. In the protests that followed, Akron police showed up in full riot gear, tear gassing and arresting demonstrators. In the wake of yet another police murder of a Black person, the National Lawyers Guild (NLG) joins the Freedom Black Led Organizing Collaborative (BLOC), Akron Democratic Socialists of America (ADSA), and Serve the People Akron in calling for an end to anti-Black police violence and brutality against protesters.

“It is unjust that police are brutalizing and arresting protesters who are mourning the violent police murder of Jayland Walker,” said Sam Heller, Mass Defense Chair of the Ohio NLG Chapter. “Local organizers provided us with a clear, community-driven outline to address ongoing police violence. We want justice, so we support their call to action.”

On Thursday, Akron advocacy groups issued a statement demanding changes to the Akron police force, including abolishing the use of tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets, as well as disarming the police forces sent to meet protests. The statement, co-written by BLOC, ADSA, and Serve the People Akron, provides the city with clear and achievable next steps. The NLG supports these urgent demands as an integral part of building more just alternatives to policing and envisioning community justice beyond the carceral state.

“We are not here to have a conversation when we are under militarized occupation, while thereare guns pointed at us, tear gas and pepper spray choking us,” Akron organizers said in the statement. “We are here to seek accountability. Residents of Akron and surrounding communities are being hurt and are dying.”

The NLG is in solidarity with Akron’s organizers and activists in their fight for justice and will continue to show up alongside movement partners in the streets and in the courtroom.

The National Lawyers Guild has used law to promote human rights over property interests for 85 years. The NLG Legal Observer program trains volunteers to witness police conduct. For more information about NLG’s activist support programs, please visit the NLG website.

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The post NLG Supports Akron’s Local Organizing Demands After Police Murder Jayland Walker first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

Member Recap: June 2022

Welcome to NLG’s Member Recap, our monthly virtual newsletter to keep you up-to-date with the latest NLG National, Chapter, and Committee news, programs, and announcements!

New Publications and Resources .kt-sc_eab2ce-96 .kt-sc-imgcol {min-height:450px;} NLG’s Updated Know Your Rights Guide is Available Now!

Our updated Know Your Rights booklet is a more comprehensive version of our classic pamphlet, with more information for protesters at higher risk of being targeted by law enforcement. This resource is best to use in advance of an action or demonstration, to give you the kinds of information that will help you know your rights and risks. Because it is much longer than the original version, it may take longer to read.

Print versions of this booklet are not available right now. We will send an email to membership when you can order them.

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.kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active {color:#ffffff;background:#444444;border-color:#444444 #444444 #444444 #444444;}.kt-accordion-id_ac8241-6d:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ac8241-6d:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#ffffff;}.kt-accordion-id_ac8241-6d:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger {background:#ffffff;}.kt-accordion-id_ac8241-6d:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ac8241-6d:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#444444;} [RECORDING] Shifting the Housing Paradigm for Tenants

During the COVID-19 pandemic, NLG attorneys focusing on housing law issues have necessarily been forced into a defensive posture: Primarily organizing and defending against evictions. However, if we are ever to substantively address the issues of economic and racial disparity, we need a more positive, long-term perspective on how to get housing – particularly multi-unit tenant housing – off the speculative market and into the hands of tenants and their communities.

Accessibility information: Closed captions forthcoming; we apologize for the delay!

.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_55dbb7-89 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Open Recording [JULY 13, 2022] CLE Webinar: Practicing Military Law as a Civilian, an Ethics CLE

This CLE is the second session of the MLTF’s Advocacy & Activism Through Military Law training program. Other trainings will be available in the near future, and you can find out more on the MLTF Training Program page, and/or join our low-volume mailing list.

Live via Zoom on July 13, 2022, at 10 am Pacific/1 pm Eastern. A recorded version of the presentation will be available a few days after that.

Accessibility information: Live captioning will not be available, but the Task Force will provide a transcript alongside the recording.

Accessibility information: Live captioning will be provided. While registration is open, you can let us know if there are other accessibility features you need in order to attend.

.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_8d50b3-e4 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Register Now [JULY 13, 2022] CLE Webinar: Practicing Military Law as a Civilian, an Ethics CLE

This CLE is the second session of the MLTF’s Advocacy & Activism Through Military Law training program. Other trainings will be available in the near future, and you can find out more on the MLTF Training Program page, and/or join our low-volume mailing list.

Live via Zoom on July 13, 2022, at 10 am Pacific/1 pm Eastern. A recorded version of the presentation will be available a few days after that.

Accessibility information: Live captioning will not be available, but the Task Force will provide a transcript alongside the recording.

.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_de2bb4-51 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Register Now [JULY 13, 2022] Webinar: FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) Use Against Animal Abuse

Each year the National Immigration Project honors a member doing outstanding work for immigrant justice. In 2021, NIPNLG named this annual award after Lisa Brodyaga, a longtime National Immigration Project and NLG member whose career representing asylum seekers, other immigrants, and U.S. citizens spanned more than 40 years. This year, we honor Laila L. Hlass, a nationally recognized immigrant rights advocate, practitioner, and legal scholar. Join us for an evening of celebration. Light hors d’hoeuvres and a cash bar will be provided.

Accessibility information: This event is in-person in NYC.

.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_7cdcb0-22 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Register Now [JULY 13, 2022] Webinar: FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) Use Against Animal Abuse

Webinar from NLG-NYC’s Animal Rights Committee.

Join the Hon. Congresswoman Dina Titus, six animal rights organizations and one intrepid journalist on July 13th, as they each describe how they used FOIA to discover and relieve the suffering of laboratory animals, farm animals and wildlife.

Live via Zoom on Wed., July 13 at 12 PM ET / 9 AM PT

.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_a9bdfe-4e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Register Now Upcoming and Ongoing Campaigns .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6 .kt-accordion-panel-inner {border-width:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6 .wp-block-kadence-pane .kt-accordion-header-wrap .kt-blocks-accordion-header 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.kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#444444;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger {background:#444444;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#eeeeee;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6 .kt-accordion-header-wrap .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active {color:#ffffff;background:#444444;border-color:#444444 #444444 #444444 #444444;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#ffffff;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger {background:#ffffff;}.kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_ab8327-c6:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#444444;} NLG’s Becoming Abolitionists Reading Group

MLTF’s Virtual Literature TableAs a part of our commitment to learning and growing together, we invite you to join us in reading Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom by Derecka Purnell as part of an NLG-wide reading group.

We encourage Chapters, Committees, and other NLG groups to use our reading guide to organize their own reading groups and discussion circles.

.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_79a2f0-3e .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Open Reading Guide Chapter, Committee, & National Announcements .kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56 .kt-accordion-panel-inner {border-width:0px 0px 0px 0px;}.kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56 .wp-block-kadence-pane .kt-accordion-header-wrap .kt-blocks-accordion-header 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.kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before, .kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basiccircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclosecircle ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrowcircle ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#444444;}.kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:hover .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger, .kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header:focus .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger 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.kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:after, .kt-accordion-id_862fd8-56:not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-basic ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-xclose ):not( .kt-accodion-icon-style-arrow ) .kt-blocks-accordion-header.kt-accordion-panel-active .kt-blocks-accordion-icon-trigger:before {background:#444444;} NLG Statement on SCOTUS Ruling in Dobbs v. JWHO

The Colorado Chapter would like to give a big shout out to Jes Jones and Z Williams for receiving the “Advancing Justice” Award from the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar on May 20, 2022. This award was given in recognition of the many months and long hours they spent supporting BLM protesters who took to the streets in response to George Floyd’s murder. Jes and Z tracked over 160 cases across the state, answered hundreds of legal line calls, and coordinated and supported over 60 pro bono attorneys, helping with everything from transportation to court hearings to strategic planning meetings with defense attorneys, and so much more, all with the help and support of NLG members here and across the nation!

Photo by Phil Cherner; Jes is on the left, Z on the right.

NLG Statement on SCOTUS Ruling in Dobbs v. JWHO

As a human rights organization, we staunchly support the rights to privacy, bodily autonomy, and medical care, and oppose the criminalization of reproductive decision-making. Our fundamental belief in maintaining abortion legalization is what compelled us to join an amicus brief on this very Supreme Court case. This regressive decision to overturn Roe v. Wade is more evidence that our current systems of law do not exist to protect people.

.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_e9b4b9-66 .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Open Statement on NLG Website NLG Military Law Task Force Responds to Military Racism

The Task Force believes that the armed forces in the United States, during this period of history, pose concerns for all people interested in civil and human rights. As an institution, the military is used to carry out an immoral, interventionist foreign policy.

.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_d9c423-fc .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Open Statement on MLTF Website NLG Military Law Task Force Statement on Overturning Roe v. Wade

With its disastrous decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court has endangered millions of pregnant people and stripped them of their autonomy and reproductive rights. Twenty-two states have laws or state constitutional provisions already in place that will totally or effectively ban abortion in light of the Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, which holds that the U.S. Constitution does not confer a right to abortion. Overturning Roe especially imperils the lives of the poor, people of color, and minors. It will also have an outsized effect on women in the military.

.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-right:5px;}.rtl .kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0{margin-left:5px;margin-right:0px;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button{color:#000000;background:#A4C400;border-color:#000000;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{color:#A4C400;border-color:#A4C400;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button::before{display:none;}.wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:hover, .wp-block-kadence-advancedbtn.kt-btns_37fe7c-fe .kt-btn-wrap-0 .kt-button:focus{background:#000000;} Open Full Statement on MLTF Website Opportunities to Get Involved with NLG Committees NLG’s Mass Incarceration Committee (MIC) needs volunteers for a project in solidarity with Jailhouse Lawyers Speak

The Mass Incarceration Committee (MIC) is recruiting members to join our Defense Committee formed in solidarity with Jailhouse Lawyers Speak, the national prisoner group which led the prison strikes of 2018 during their Shut ‘Em Down demonstrations.

We are looking for legal workers and law students who can show up in mutual aid and respond to the leadership of prisoner activists in their fight for liberation. All are welcome, but a preference for folks located in Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Texas, Washington State, Oregon, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, New York, California, and Colorado.

Volunteers will be asked to commit to:

  • Offer up to 8 hours a month for a few months beginning in August
  • Attendance of an information session with MIC leadership and attorneys
  • Sign a confidentiality agreement
  • Work in a team collaboratively
  • Support attorneys with research, writing, and other logistical support

Please direct inquiries to Jenipher Jones, lead counsel for the JLS International Law Project at micjlsnlg@gmail.com.

NLG Student Spotlight: Celebrating NLG’s Class of 2022 Graduates and Awardees

Congratulations to our student members on a fantastic academic year!
2022 NLG Law Student Awards and Graduates

The post Member Recap: June 2022 first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.

NLG Condemns State Violence against Reproductive Justice Protest

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 28, 2022

Contact: Director of Communications
communications@nlg.org
(212) 679-5100, ext. 5

New York City, NY — Law enforcement forcibly detained and arrested protesters across the country and specifically targeted Legal Observers serving as trained witnesses of police conduct over the weekend at protests in Los Angeles and Phoenix. The NLG condemns police violence against protesters and Legal Observers as acts of state repression and human rights violations.

“Both the Dobbs decision and state repression of protest against it violate human rights, ” said Suzanne Adely, President of the National Lawyers Guild. “Targeting Legal Observers, who serve as trained witnesses of police conduct, is an act of state repression that shows dangerous police entitlement to unchecked power and violence. To truly reject the Supreme Court decision, we must support protesters.”

The NLG recommends anyone attending a protest learn about their rights before attending, using resources like their new booklet: Know Your Rights: A Guide for Protesters

The National Lawyers Guild has used law to promote human rights over property interests for 85 years. The NLG Legal Observer program trains volunteers to witness police conduct. For more information about NLG’s activist support programs, please visit the NLG website.

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The post NLG Condemns State Violence against Reproductive Justice Protest first appeared on National Lawyers Guild.